6 Reasons Why Automation Can't Replace Manual Software Testing

With so much of the infrastructure we rely on in our daily lives dependent on accurate and unfailing software, it's more important than ever to catch and correct bugs in the code. As such, there has been a big push lately toward more automation in QA testing.
Guy Hand Coding

Testing and quality assurance are amongst the biggest constraints when it comes to delivering software products on time. While customers and clients generally understand that no software is ever truly bug-free when it first ships, a critical bug or error can be devastating to a developer's sales and reputation. 

With so much of the infrastructure we rely on in our daily lives dependent on accurate and unfailing software, it's more important than ever to catch and correct bugs in the code. As such, there has been a big push lately toward more automation in QA testing. 

The argument goes that automated, script-driven testing can test more components more accurately, rigorously, and consistently than human testers can, and in a fraction of the time. That's true, but those who favor automated testing have to contend with the fact that, while automation can do many things better and faster than human beings, there are still many things it can't do at all. 

Manual testing is still a vital part of the QA process and human testers are far from obsolete. In fact, many businesses do not achieve their desired results with automated testing alone. 

The 2017-18 World Quality Report found that automated testing technologies only perform about 15% of common test activities. A hybrid approach that uses automation while covering the gaps with manual testing may be the ideal approach, but it's important to understand the strengths and unique benefits that manual testing can provide.

Don't get us wrong—we're big fans of automation here...

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